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Roger Moore review

May 23, 2017

So Roger Moore has left us. When I was growing up he was my ideal of an English action hero – as the Saint, as the handsome half of the Persuaders and as James Bond. And it came to pass, some four decades later, that I reviewed his autobiography for the Independent. Regrettably it was not as positive a review as I should have liked to be able to give; nevertheless it was an honest review and paid tribute to his amazing career – and so here it is: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/books/reviews/my-word-is-my-bond-by-roger-moore-1757291.html

P.S. May I bring to your attention my comic fantasy YA novel The Infinite Powers of Adam Gowers – here is the link: https://unbound.com/books/adam-gowers . Go there and you will see a neat little 2-minute video of me explaining why the time for this novel has come! And if you support it you will get your name in the back and an invitation to the launch party.

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2 Comments
  1. Mark Brafield permalink

    I was a big Roger Moore fan too. I liked him as James Bond (‘Live and let die’ was my favourite) but he was a style icon for me as Brett Sinclair in The Persuaders, that theme tune winding its way round your head as he appeared in his Bahama Yellow Aston Martin DBS, before arguing with Tony Curtis in a bar as to whether you should have one olive or two in a Martini. Hideously dated now but at the time I was hooked. I guess I still am. A great character, if not a great actor, and, let us not forget, a wonderful ambassador for charity. May he rest in peace.

  2. Simon Carter permalink

    The opening titles to The Persuaders and John Barry’s theme tune are very evocative; one thing they evoke is the feeling that it’s Sunday afternoon and, as usual, I haven’t done my homework.
    Actors autobiographies cover such a broad spectrum from Anthony Sher’s marvellous descriptions of how he prepares for a role to David Niven’s breezy memoirs that they must be quite hard to review. Personally I found Peter O’Toole’s almost Joycean efforts almost unreadable but others seem to have enjoyed them.

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